TITLE

Carving of non-asbestiform tremolite and the risk of lung cancer: a follow-up mortality study in a historical nephrite processing cohort

AUTHOR(S)
Hsiao-Yu Yang; Ruei-Hao Shie; Pau-Chung Chen
PUB. DATE
December 2013
SOURCE
Occupational & Environmental Medicine;Dec2013, Vol. 70 Issue 12, p852
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objectives The health risks associated with exposure to non-asbestiform asbestos minerals, including nephrite, are unclear. In 1965 nephrite processing began in the town of Fengtian in Taiwan, and the majority of inhabitants were involved in the industry from 1970 until 1980. The objectives of this study were to examine lung cancer deaths and assess the carcinogenic effects of nephrite carving. Methods We studied mortality due to lung cancer (ICD-9 code 162 for cancers of the trachea, bronchus and lung) from 1979 to 2011. We calculated the standardised mortality ratio (SMR) for lung cancer using the age- and sex-specific cancer mortality rates in eastern Taiwan as the standard rates. Air samples, bulk samples and a surface sample were analysed. Results Nephrite is a non-asbestiform asbestos mineral composed of microcrystalline tremolite. During nephrite processing, in personal air samples the average concentration of elongated mineral particles with the morphological characteristics of asbestos fibres was 1.4f/cm³, with rough grinding generating the highest concentrations (4.7 f/cm³). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that the air samples contained intact asbestiform tremolite fibres. The ambient air samples and the wipe sample indicated paraoccupational contamination. The crude mortality rates for lung cancer were higher in Fengtian than in Taiwan for all age groups and both genders. The SMR for lung cancer was 1.28 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.45). Conclusions Nephrite carving may increase the risk of lung cancer. Appropriate medical monitoring is warranted for workers who are exposed to similar materials.
ACCESSION #
92013177

 

Related Articles

  • Lung cancer a prescribed industrial disease.  // Accountancy;Apr87, Vol. 99 Issue 1124, p53 

    Announces the addition of lung cancer to the list of prescribed industrial diseases under regulations which took effect on April 1, 1987. Eligibility of employees to payments under the Industrial Injuries Benefit Scheme.

  • Lung cancer a prescribed industrial disease.  // Accountancy;Apr87, Vol. 99 Issue 1124, p53 

    Announces the addition of lung cancer to the list of prescribed industrial diseases under regulations which took effect on April 1, 1987. Eligibility of employees to payments under the Industrial Injuries Benefit Scheme.

  • Cause-specific mortality and cancer incidence among 28 300 Royal Norwegian Navy servicemen followed for more than 50 years. Strand, Leif Aage; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Koefoed, Vilhelm F.; Sommerfelt-Pettersen, Jan; Grimsrud, Tom Kristian // Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health;Jul2011, Vol. 37 Issue 4, p307 

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine mortality and cancer incidence in a cohort of 28 300 military servicemen known, from personnel files, to have served in the Royal Norwegian Navy during 1950-2004. Methods The cohort was followed from 1951-2007 for mortality and from 1953-2008 for...

  • On talc, tremolite, and tergiversation Morgan, W. K. C.; Reger, Robert // British Journal of Industrial Medicine;Aug1990, Vol. 47 Issue 8, p505 

    No abstract available.

  • Mortality in a cohort of vermiculite miners exposed to fibrous amphibole in Libby, Montana. McDonald, J. C.; Harris, J.; Armstrong, B. // Occupational & Environmental Medicine;Apr2004, Vol. 61 Issue 4, p363 

    Background: Fibrous tremolite is a widespread amphibole asbestiform mineral, airborne fibres of which constitute an environmental hazard in Libby, Montana, northern California, and elsewhere. Aims: To determine excess risk from lung cancer, mesothelioma, and all-cause mortality in a cohort of...

  • Cohort Mortality Study of Vermiculite Miners Exposed to Fibrous Tremolite: An Update. McDonald, J. C.; Harris, J.; Armstrong, B. // Annals of Occupational Hygiene;2002, Vol. 46 Issue suppl_1, p93 

    A further follow-up was made of a cohort of 406 American vermiculite mine workers exposed on average to 18 fibres/ml of tremolite. Total deaths to the end of 1999 were: all causes 285 (SMR 1.27), lung cancer 44 (SMR 2.40), mesothelioma 12 (PMR 4.21%). Lung cancer SMRs increased steeply with...

  • Lung Cancer among Pesticide Workers Exposed to Inorganic Arsenicals. Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Lilienfeld, Abraham M.; Snell, Laura M. // Archives of Environmental Health;Sep/Oct79, Vol. 34 Issue 5 

    Examines the cause of lung cancer among pesticide workers exposed to inorganic arsenicals in Baltimore, Maryland. Number of expected deaths in terms of Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR); Increase of SMR for lung cancer and anemias in males; Health effects of exposure to arsenals and nonarsenals.

  • Mortality results for polyurethane manufacture understated. Mirer, F.E.; Sorahan, T.; Nichols, L. // Occupational & Environmental Medicine;Jun2003, Vol. 60 Issue 6, p459 

    Criticizes an article regarding the mortality result for polyurethane manufacture. Chemicals usually present in foam moulding operations; Discussion on health related termination of exposure; Reason that excess standardized mortality ratio for female lung cancer is not due to isocyanate exposure.

  • Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung cancer in men: evidence from a population-based case-control study in eight Canadian provinces. Villeneuve, Paul J.; Parent, Marie-lise; Harris, Shelley A.; Johnson, Kenneth C. // BMC Cancer;2012, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p595 

    Background: Asbestos is classified as a human carcinogen, and studies have consistently demonstrated that workplace exposure to it increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Few studies have evaluated risks in population-based settings where there is a greater variety in the types of...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics