TITLE

The Effect of Stocking Density on Growth Performance and Hematological Profile of Stellate Sturgeon (A. stellatus, Pallas, 1771) Fingerlings Reared in an Industrial "Flow-through" Aquaculture System

AUTHOR(S)
DICU (STROE), Maria D.; CRISTEA, Victor; MAEREANU, Marilena; DEDIU, Lorena; PETREA, ştefan M.
PUB. DATE
July 2013
SOURCE
Bulletin of the University of Agricultural Sciences & Veterinary;2013, Vol. 70 Issue 2, p244
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The most studied among sturgeon native species, when we speak about growth performance in intensive aquaculture systems is stellate sturgeon (Acipenser stellatus, Pallas1771). The level of intensity of an industrial growth system was give by its stocking density maximum level, which generally defines the quantity of biomass per unit of volume. The present paper aims to assess, in general terms, the production potential of industrial flow-through aquaculture systems for stellate sturgeon fingerlings growth and especially to determine a certain stocking density that maintains a positive correlation between growth rate and physiological state of biological material. The biological material consists in a number of 1200 stellate sturgeon fingerlings, with an average weight of 5,52g±0.06 g, that were divided into six growth units by three stocking densities, in replicate: 2,78 kg/m3 (V1), 3,66 kg/m3 (V2) and 4,59 kg/m3 (V3). At the end of 45 days trial, the biological material was evaluated physiologically and in terms of growth. At the end of the experiment, the growth performance indicators registered insignificant values (p>0.05), higher in case of the experimental variant with lower stocking density. This variant also presents a better-feed conversion ratio. The hematological profile remains constant for the three experimental variants. The only indicator that is significantly influenced (p<0.05) by stocking density is the hematocrit and implicitly the mean corpuscular volume. A higher stocking density for stellate sturgeon fingerlings growth in an industrial flow-through aquaculture system did not significantly influenced neither the biological material growth nor its physiological state but decreased the survival rate.
ACCESSION #
91981516

 

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