TITLE

Reading Alice Munro's Early Fiction: A Kristevian Analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Prasad Nath, Debarshi
PUB. DATE
July 2012
SOURCE
Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities;2012, Vol. 4 Issue 2, p172
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
There is an underlying and passive tension that brings a subtle darkness to many of Alice Munro's narratives and there is always something slightly uncanny about her characters and their situations. In fact, there are many things that go unsaid in Munro's narratives. The darkness that surrounds her stories is illuminated in an order of oppositions that make it difficult to distinguish accident from fate, the random from the carefully veiled design, the semiotic from the Symbolic. Munro's attempt to dismantle the linearity and unilateral direction of the patriarchal literary tradition can be analysed with the help of the ideas proposed by Julia Kristeva. Munro repeatedly explores the place of the Kristevian abject in her narratives. She frequently returns to her sudden revelations of the submerged but rock-hard realities of life, certain sets of situations that threaten her characters' sense of control over their lives and belief in subject/object categorization. Munro's subtle subversions reveal her concern for evolving a language that would be expressive of women's experiences.
ACCESSION #
91686452

 

Related Articles

  • Incarceration, focalization and narration: Adapting the two selves in 'Boys and Girls'1. Ue, Tom // Short Fiction in Theory & Practice;Oct2014, Vol. 4 Issue 2, p175 

    Criticism on Alice Munro has neglected many adaptations of her writing. This article offers a corrective by examining Don McBrearty's 25-minute short film 'Boys and Girls' (1983), based on the story of the same title. In this article, I explore how Munro's treatment of metanarration and her...

  • "Don't Tell (on) Daddy": Narrative Complexity in Alice Munro's "The Love of a Good Woman". Carrington, Ildiko de Papp // Studies in Short Fiction;Spring97, Vol. 34 Issue 2, p159 

    Discusses the metafictional, many-voiced narrative about narration in Alice Munro's short story 'The Love of a Good Woman.' Description of the narrative process that indicates the story's complexity; Process that forces readers to question their interpretation of the narrative; How the...

  • ALICE MUNRO'S 'LIVES OF GIRLS AND WOMEN:' A DEVIATION FROM CONVENTIONAL CANADIAN SHORT STORY. KULKARNI, SHARMILA // Indian Streams Research Journal;Jan2013, Vol. 2 Issue 12, Special section p1 

    Short story emerged as the most popular form of literature in late 20th century and Canadian women writers - Mavis Gallant, Margaret Atwood. Margaret Lawrence and Alice Munro are amongst the most esteemed short story writers of the world. Alice Munro has exclusively dealt with the short story...

  • Reading Like Munro. HEIGHTON, STEVEN // Brick: A Literary Journal;Winter2015, Issue 94, p80 

    The article analyzes the short story "Pictures of the Ice" by Alice Munro. It explores the writing styles of Munro which are unfunctional, untransitional and plot-furthering. It highlights the hologram-effect offered by Munro that has led readers towards a rich landscape of life. The compression...

  • Munro's Narrative Art. Reyns-Chikuma, Chris // Canadian Literature;Summer2014, Issue 221, p154 

    No abstract available.

  • The Temporal Art of the Short Story The Bear Came Over the Mountain. Yiping Su // Theory & Practice in Language Studies;Mar2015, Vol. 5 Issue 3, p535 

    Alice Munro is a Canadian author writing in English. Her stories explore human complexities in an uncomplicated prose style. Munro's work has been described as having revolutionized the architecture of short stories for its tendency of moving forward and backward in time is in particular. This...

  • Speech Presentation and "Coloured" Narrative in Alice Munro's Who Do You Think You Are? Somacarrera, Pilar // Textual Studies in Canada;Winter1998, Issue 10/11, p69 

    The article discusses speech presentation in the book "Who Do You Think You Are?," by Alice Munro. Literary critic Ildikó de Papp Garrington observes that in Munro's third person stories, there are often two splits: the same kind of internal split in the protagonist as in the first person...

  • "Surprising Developments": Midlife in Alice Munro's "Who Do You Think You Are?" Jamieson, Sara // Canadian Literature;Summer2013, Issue 217, p54 

    The article focuses on the depiction of middle age in the book "Who Do You Think You Are?" by Alice Munro. The heroine of the book returns to her hometown during her middle age to help her stepmother in moving to an old age home. The book focuses on the anxiety and stress which may accompany the...

  • Another Little Story Comes Along. Simon, Linda // World & I;Jul2002, Vol. 17 Issue 7, p207 

    Profiles author Alice Munro. Biography of Munro; Collection of novels written by Munro; Inspiration to Munro's writing career.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics