TITLE

Estudio de prevalencia puntual en un hospital pediátrico de tercer nivel

AUTHOR(S)
Lombardo-A, Dra. Esther; Hernández-O, Dra. Hilda; Pérez-R, Víctor Manuel; Orozco, Hazel; Soto, Elvia; Haro, Anabel; Caniza, Miguela
PUB. DATE
March 2012
SOURCE
Acta Pediatrica de Mexico;mar/abr2012, Vol. 33 Issue 2, p76
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Introduction. Systematic epidemiological surveillance is major policy that should be implemented in every hospital since it allows to assess the actual incidence of nosocomial infections, determine its causes and implement timely prevention and control measures. Point preva-lence studies were done to survey nosocomial infections and to determine in a population at a given time the number of infected patients, i.e. nosocomial infections (NI) and in addition to indirectly evaluate the quality of functioning of the system of epidemiological surveillance. Objective. To determine the point prevalence rate of nosocomial infection as well as the risk factors involved. Material and methods. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted of the point prevalence of nosocomial infection in a third level hospital from April 15 to April 17 of 2010 in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and in the service of Medicines. Results. We studied 20 hospitalized patients in the NICU with an average age of 57 days and hospital stay of 40 days. There were two NI (one patients with clinical sepsis and one with bacteremia). In the service of medicines we studied 21 patients with an average age of 4.9 years and hospital stay of 38 days. In both services risk extrinsic factors to acquire NI were prolonged stay, central venous catheter, mechanical ventilation and the use of antibiotics. Analysis: Predominant risk factors were central venous catheter (>44 %), mechanical ventilation (>10 %) and the use of antibiotics (>26 %), similar to studies reported in the literature. Infections present in both services occurred in the bloodstream. In two of the cases the etiologic agent was not identified.
ACCESSION #
91516926

 

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics