TITLE

Divided they will fall

AUTHOR(S)
Stanglin, D.
PUB. DATE
December 1991
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;12/30/91-1/6/92, Vol. 111 Issue 27, People to watch p75
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Predicts that the economy in the former Soviet Union will make or break Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev's heirs. The disagreement between Russian President Boris Yeltsin and Russian Vice President Alexander Rutskoi; Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk is the key to the success or failure of the new commonwealth of former Soviet republics.
ACCESSION #
9112301276

 

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