TITLE

Moons christened

PUB. DATE
October 1991
SOURCE
New Scientist;10/5/91, Vol. 132 Issue 1789, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Announces that the six moons of Neptune discovered by Voyager 2 have been named. What the names are; Why the names are controversial; Acceptance by the International Astronomical Union.
ACCESSION #
9110213668

 

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