TITLE

Convicts' DNA prints added to US police files

AUTHOR(S)
Charles, Dan
PUB. DATE
September 1991
SOURCE
New Scientist;9/21/91, Vol. 131 Issue 1787, p19
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article details how DNA samples are being used by some United States law enforcement agencies to keep genetic profiles of criminals. The purpose of these DNA banks is to help solve future crimes, says Paul Ferrara, director of Virginia's Division of Forensic Sciences. Police will try to match DNA patterns from blood, hair or semen stains found at the scene of a crime to DNA data on past offenders. Originally, forensic data banks of genetic information were set up specifically to help solve rape cases. Many states now allow much broader use of DNA databanks, usually covering anyone convicted of a serious criminal offence.
ACCESSION #
9110143437

 

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