TITLE

Mars Scout Options Range From Orbit to Surface

AUTHOR(S)
Morring, Jr., Frank
PUB. DATE
December 2002
SOURCE
Aviation Week & Space Technology;12/16/2002, Vol. 157 Issue 25, p33
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the plans of the U.S. National Aeronautics & Space Administration for its mission to Mars. Highlights of the option selected for the mission; Plans for sample collection for investigation of Mars; Facilities to be provided by Lockheed Martin for aerial regional-scale environmental survey; Key features of the Mars volcanic emission and life scout.
ACCESSION #
9109544

 

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