TITLE

Does Training in Problem Solving Improve the Quality of Group Decisions?

AUTHOR(S)
Ganster, Daniel C.; Poppler, Paul; Williams, Steve
PUB. DATE
June 1991
SOURCE
Journal of Applied Psychology;Jun91, Vol. 76 Issue 3, p479
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The efficacy of a training program designed to improve the quality of group decisions by increasing the decision-making capabilities of the group's members was evaluated. A study by Bottger and Yetton (1987) that demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach suffered from design flaws that threatened the internal validity of their conclusion. In the present study, a randomized design with adequate power was used, and the efficacy of this training was not supported for either individual or group decision quality. The data support Bottger and Yetton's contention that member ability is an important contributor to group performance. However, Bottger and Yetton's training program addressed general decision-making ability, whereas task-specific ability may be more important.
ACCESSION #
9107220342

 

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