TITLE

Supplemental glycine and threonine effects on performance, intestinal mucosa development, and nutrient utilization of growing broiler chickens

AUTHOR(S)
Ospina-Rojas, I. C.; Murakami, A. E.; Oliveira, C. A. L.; Guerra, A. F. Q. G.
PUB. DATE
October 2013
SOURCE
Poultry Science;Oct2013, Vol. 92 Issue 10, p2724
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A study was conducted to evaluate Gly requirements in low-CP diets with different levels of digestible (dig) Thr, and their effects on performance, intestinal mucosal development, and nutrient utilization of broiler chickens from 21 to 35 d age. A total of 240 twenty-one-day-old Cobb-Vantress male broiler chickens were distributed in a completely randomized 4 × 2 factorial arrangement for a total of 8 treatments with 5 replicates of 6 birds each. The treatments consisted of 4 levels of Gly+Ser (1.47, 1.57, 1.67, or 1.77%) and 2 levels of dig Thr (0.70 or 0.77%, corresponding to 100 or 110% of Thr requirements, respectively). Common diets were fed to broilers until 20 d of age. At d 35, an interaction (P ≤ 0.01) was observed between the Gly+Ser and dig Thr levels for G:F. Glycine supplementation resulted in a linear increase (P < 0.05) in BW gain, G:F, intestinal mucin secretion, apparent digestibility of fat, and AME values of the experimental diets. Threonine levels greater than the levels required (0.77%) improved (P < 0.05) G:F and increased (P < 0.05) intestinal mucin secretion. However, intestinal morphometry and the number of goblet cells in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were not affected by the treatments. The dietary Gly+Ser level necessary to optimize G:F in low-CP diets containing 0.77% Thr for broiler chickens during growth was estimated to be 1.54%; however, this requirement may be greater than 1.77% in diets with 0.70% Thr. Supplemental Gly may be essential to support maximum performance for broiler chickens from 21 to 35 d of age when they are fed diets based exclusively on vegetable ingredients and with low protein levels. Glycine can directly or indirectly influence the proper function of the intestinal mucosa and improve dietary energy utilization.
ACCESSION #
90578068

 

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