TITLE

Observing the Earth beneath Our Feet

AUTHOR(S)
Paine, Jeffrey G.
PUB. DATE
January 2012
SOURCE
University of Texas at Austin. Bureau of Economic Geology. Annua;2012, p102
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In the article, the author discusses their work at the Bureau of Economic Geology in the U.S. as of early 2012, particularly in the field of coastal and landscape research. He focuses on the surficial deposits that produce food and support homes, roads and businesses, as well as the effects of modern geologic processes like hurricane, floods and faulting. Among the tools they used are ground-penetrating radar and airborne laser mapping (lidar).
ACCESSION #
90477693

 

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