TITLE

How to Be a Friendly Skeptical Theist

AUTHOR(S)
Jonbäck, Francis
PUB. DATE
September 2012
SOURCE
Forum Philosophicum;Autumn2012, Vol. 17 Issue 2, p197
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In this paper Skeptical Theism is described, applied and defended. Furthermore, William Rowe's position of Friendly Atheism is described and a version of Friendly Theism suggested. It is shown that Skeptical Theism can be defended against two common arguments and that skeptical theists might be able to adopt the position of Friendly Theism.
ACCESSION #
90443999

 

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