TITLE

EMPLOYER SURVEILLANCE VERSUS EMPLOYEE PRIVACY: THE NEW REALITY OF SOCIAL MEDIA AND WORKPLACE PRIVACY

AUTHOR(S)
Ghoshray, Saby
PUB. DATE
July 2013
SOURCE
Northern Kentucky Law Review;2013, Vol. 40 Issue 3, p593
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the association between employee behavior in social media and privacy expectation at workplace in the U.S. It examines the private seclusion zone of employees through employer surveillance. It discusses the applicability of the First Amendment jurisprudence in determining employee behaviors within the scope of settled jurisprudence.
ACCESSION #
90242325

 

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