TITLE

An Early Usage of wank, Antedating OED Entry

AUTHOR(S)
Davies, Keri; Whitehead, Angus
PUB. DATE
September 2013
SOURCE
Notes & Queries;Sep2013, Vol. 60 Issue 3, p376
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the history and usage of the word wank, meaning the act of male masturbation, in the "Oxford English Dictionary." It addresses the linguistic history of the slang word, the use of the word wank in early 20th century Edwardian homoerotic fiction, and the possible Scottish origins of the word.
ACCESSION #
90017819

 

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