TITLE

Wall Cabinet of Maple

AUTHOR(S)
Holden, Brad
PUB. DATE
June 2012
SOURCE
American Woodworker;Jun/Jul2012, Issue 160, p42
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers step-by-step instructions for making a wall cabinet using a spalted maple wood.
ACCESSION #
89775644

 

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