TITLE

Potential surface temperature and shallow groundwater temperature response to climate change: an example from a small forested catchment in east-central New Brunswick (Canada)

AUTHOR(S)
Kurylyk, B. L.; Bourque, C. P.-A.; MacQuarrie, K. T. B.
PUB. DATE
July 2013
SOURCE
Hydrology & Earth System Sciences;2013, Vol. 17 Issue 7, p2701
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Global climate models project significant changes to air temperature and precipitation regimes in many regions of the Northern Hemisphere. These meteorological changes will have associated impacts to surface and shallow subsurface thermal regimes, which are of interest to practitioners and researchers in many disciplines of the natural sciences. For example, groundwater temperature is critical for providing and sustaining suitable thermal habitat for cold-water salmonids. To investigate the surface and subsurface thermal effects of atmospheric climate change, seven down-scaled climate scenarios (2046-2065) for a small forested catchment in New Brunswick, Canada were employed to drive the surface energy and moisture flux model, ForHyM2. Results from these seven simulations indicate that climate change-induced increases in air temperature and changes in snow cover could increase summer surface temperatures (range -0.30 to +3.49 °C, mean +1.49 °C), but decrease winter surface temperatures (range -1.12 to +0.08 °C, mean -0.53 °C) compared to the reference period simulation. Thus, changes to the timing and duration of snow cover will likely decouple changes in mean annual air temperature (mean +2.11 °C) and mean annual ground surface temperature (mean+1.06 °C). Projected surface temperature data were then used to drive an empirical surface to groundwater temperature transfer function developed from measured surface and groundwater temperature. Results from the empirical transfer function suggest that changes in groundwater temperature will exhibit seasonality at shallow depths (1.5 m), but be seasonally constant and approximately equivalent to the change in the mean annual surface temperature at deeper depths (8.75 m). The simulated increases in future groundwater temperature suggest that the thermal sensitivity of baseflow-dominated streams to decadal climate change may be greater than previous studies have indicated.
ACCESSION #
89575956

 

Related Articles

  • Potential surface temperature and shallow groundwater temperature response to climate change: an example from a small forested catchment in east-central New Brunswick (Canada). Kurylyk, B. L.; Bourque, C. P.-A.; MacQuarrie, K. T. B. // Hydrology & Earth System Sciences Discussions;2013, Vol. 10 Issue 3, p3283 

    Global climate models project significant changes to the air temperature and precipitation regimes in some regions of the Northern Hemisphere. These meteorological changes will have associated impacts to the surface and shallow subsurface thermal regimes, which are of interest to practitioners...

  • Climate model validation and selection for hydrological applications in representative Mediterranean catchments. Deidda, R.; Marrocu, M.; Caroletti, G.; Pusceddu, G.; Langousis, A.; Lucarini, V.; Puliga, M.; Speranza, A. // Hydrology & Earth System Sciences Discussions;2013, Vol. 10 Issue 7, p9105 

    This paper discusses the relative performance of several climate models in providing reliable forcing for hydrological modeling in six representative catchments in the Mediterranean region. We consider 14 Regional Climate Models (RCMs), from the EU-FP6 ENSEMBLES project, run for the A1B emission...

  • Regional climate models' performance in representing precipitation and temperature over selected Mediterranean areas. Deidda, R.; Marrocu, M.; Caroletti, G.; Pusceddu, G.; Langousis, A.; Lucarini, V.; Puliga, M.; Speranza, A. // Hydrology & Earth System Sciences;Dec2013, Vol. 17 Issue 12, p5041 

    This paper discusses the relative performance of several climate models in providing reliable forcing for hydrological modeling in six representative catchments in the Mediterranean region. We consider 14 Regional Climate Models (RCMs), from the EU-FP6 ENSEMBLES project, run for the A1B emission...

  • Evaluation of the JULES land surface model in simulating catchment hydrology in Southern Africa. MacKellar, N. C.; Dadson, S. J.; New, M.; Wolski, P. // Hydrology & Earth System Sciences Discussions;2013, Vol. 10 Issue 8, p11093 

    Land surface models (LSMs) are advanced tools which can be used to estimate energy, water and biogeochemical exchanges at regional scales. The inclusion of a river flow routing module in an LSM allows for the simulation of river discharge from a catchment and offers an approach to evaluate the...

  • Assessment of Bias Assumptions for Climate Models. Kerkhoff, Christian; Künsch, Hans R.; Schär, Christoph // Journal of Climate;Sep2014, Vol. 27 Issue 17, p6799 

    Climate scenarios make implicit or explicit assumptions about the extrapolation of climate model biases from current to future time periods. Such assumptions are inevitable because of the lack of future observations. This manuscript reviews different bias assumptions found in the literature and...

  • An Objective Bayesian Improved Approach for Applying Optimal Fingerprint Techniques to Estimate Climate Sensitivity*. Lewis, Nicholas // Journal of Climate;Oct2013, Vol. 26 Issue 19, p7414 

    A detailed reanalysis is presented of a 'Bayesian' climate parameter study (as exemplified by Forest et al.) that estimates climate sensitivity (ECS) jointly with effective ocean diffusivity and aerosol forcing, using optimal fingerprints to compare multidecadal observations with simulations by...

  • Predicting long-term change of groundwater level with regional climate model in South Korea. Jang, Seong; Hamm, Se-Yeong; Yoon, Heesung; Kim, Gyoo-Bum; Park, Jae-Hyun; Kim, MoonSu // Geosciences Journal;Sep2015, Vol. 19 Issue 3, p503 

    Global climate change causes a high variability in precipitation and surface temperature increase in the world. Global climate models (GCMs) are effectively used to predict climate change at a global scale. In contrast, regional climate models (RCMs) can more efficiently predict climate change...

  • Simulations of Seasonal Snow in the Upper Colorado River Basin.  // CO2 Science;9/12/2012, Vol. 15 Issue 37, p6 

    The article discusses research which assessed the performance of multiple regional climate models (RCMs) for seasonal mountain snow in the Upper Colorado River Basin. It references a study by L. O. Mearns et al published in a 2009 issue of the journal "Transactions of the American Geophysical...

  • Regionalization of patterns of flow intermittence from gauging station records. Snelder, T. H.; Datry, T.; Lamouroux, N.; Larned, S. T.; Sauquet, E.; Pella, H.; Catalogne, C. // Hydrology & Earth System Sciences;2013, Vol. 17 Issue 7, p2685 

    Understanding large-scale patterns in flow intermittence is important for effective river management. The duration and frequency of zero-flow periods are associated with the ecological characteristics of rivers and have important implications for water resources management. We used daily flow...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics