TITLE

SULLIVAN'S LAST STAND

AUTHOR(S)
Stone, Christian; Hersch, Hank
PUB. DATE
October 1992
SOURCE
Sports Illustrated;10/22/92, Vol. 77 Issue 17, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
By 1892 John L. Sullivan had been the champion of the world of bare-knuckle fighting for a decade, though it had been three years since he defended his title in a 75-rounder against Jake Kilrain. The prizefight game had changed since John L. knocked-out Kilrain--in 1890 it had become legal in Louisiana--and the 33-year-old Sullivan made the first sanctioned heavyweight title fight ever the stage of his last defense. A former bank clerk, Corbett lacked Sullivan's raw power in the ring and his roguish charm out of it. At the opening gong a snarling Sullivan charged out of his corner, determined to catch his agile challenger before he could sprint away. Heretofore John L. had been renowned for his sturdy constitution.
ACCESSION #
8953081

 

Related Articles

  • THE OUTLAW BRAWL THAT STARTED IT ALL. Hoffer, Richard // Sports Illustrated;5/6/2002, Vol. 96 Issue 19, p64 

    Remembers a bare-fisted brawl between John L. Sullivan and Jake Kilrain in 1889. How the event made a star out of Sullivan, who knocked down Kilrain 24 times during their 75 round battle; Influence on modern-day boxing; Stories that have been written about the epic match.

  • John L. Sullivan.  // Irish Heroes & Heroines of America;2004, p194 

    This article profile legendary boxer John L. Sullivan. The indomitable boxer-known as the Boston Strongboy-plied his trade in an era when boxing was illegal in many areas, and when boxing was fought under rules that offered virtually unlimited rounds and allowed for bare-knuckle boxing. Sullivan...

  • Yours Truly, John L. Sullivan. Durant, John // American Heritage;Aug1959, Vol. 10 Issue 5, p54 

    The article profiles John L. Sullivan, a bare knuckle fighter known as Strong Boy in Boston, Massachusetts. Simply called John L. because of the way he wrote his signature on air, was considered as the first sports hero in the U.S. He was a champion fighter even if he was a heavy drinker and had...

  • The Boston Strong Boy. Ward, Geoffrey C. // American Heritage;Sep/Oct88, Vol. 39 Issue 6, p12 

    Features heavyweight boxer John L. Sullivan. His influence on U.S. boxing; Career background in the field of boxing; Achievements and failures as a boxer.

  • 1889.  // American Heritage;Jul/Aug89, Vol. 40 Issue 5, p30 

    Reports on events in American history in July and August of 1889. Barenuckle boxing; Jake Kilrain who defeated John L. Sullivan in the last legal barenuckle boxing match in the United States; Prize money.

  • Heavyweights.  // World Almanac & Book of Facts;2008, p955 

    An almanac entry for International Boxing Hall of Fame inductees in the Heaveyweight division from 1882-2007 is presented. They include John L. Sullivan, the title holder from 1882-1892, Muhammad Ali from 1974-1978 and Ruslan Chagaev in 2007. Larry Holmes relinquished his WBC title in December...

  • Out-of-ring circuses. McCallum, Jack; Kennedy, Kostya // Sports Illustrated;11/27/95, Vol. 83 Issue 23, p26 

    Makes observations concerning the behavior of several fighters who have engaged in fighting out of the ring. Peter McNeeley, pleading not guilty to hitting a man with a beer bottle in 1995; John L. Sullivan, 1890s; Billy Conn, punching his father-in-law, 1942; Sonny Liston, hitting a police...

  • AND WHO WOULD WANT TO BADGER JOHN L. SULLIVAN? .  // American Heritage;Aug/Sep1980, Vol. 31 Issue 5, p112 

    The article presents a clarification from reader and contributor Peter Andrews regarding a statement in an article about boxer John L. Sullivan published in the April/May 1982 issue. According to him, Sullivan fought from 1886 to 1888 and 1891, countering the statement that Sullivan had not...

  • John L. Sullivan: The Last Bare-Knuckle Champion. Kingseed, Wyatt // American History;Feb2006, Vol. 40 Issue 6, p28 

    This article focuses on U.S. bare-knuckle boxer John L. Sullivan. One of the reasons why Sullivan decided to retire from prizefighting was his interest in the theater. On September 7, 1892, Sullivan fought and lost to his challenger Jim Corbett. Part of Corbett's strategy was to irritate and...

Share

Read the Article

Other Topics