TITLE

Nucleotide sequence of a gene encoding an organophosphorus nerve agent degrading enzyme from Alteromonas haloplanktis

AUTHOR(S)
Cheng, T-c; Liu, L; Wang, B; Wu, J; DeFrank, J J; Anderson, D M; Rastogi, V K; Hamilton, A B
PUB. DATE
January 1997
SOURCE
Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology;Jan97, Vol. 18 Issue 1, p49
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Organophosphorus acid anhydrolases (OPAA) catalyzing the hydrolysis of a variety of toxic organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitors offer potential for decontamination of G-type nerve agents and pesticides. The gene (opa) encoding an OPAA was cloned from the chromosomal DNA of Alteromonas haloplanktis ATCC 23821. The nucleotide sequence of the 1.7-kb DNA fragment contained the opa gene (1.3 kb) and its flanking region. We report structural and functional similarity of OPAAs from A. haloplanktis and Alteromonas sp JD6.5 with the enzyme prolidase that hydrolyzes dipeptides with a prolyl residue in the carboxyl-terminal position. These results corroborate the earlier conclusion that the OPAA is a type of X-Pro dipeptidase, and that X-Pro could be the native substrate for such an enzyme in Alteromonas cells.
ACCESSION #
8889879

 

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