TITLE

Anti-A isoagglutinin as a risk factor for the development of pure red cell aplasia after major ABO-incompatible allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

AUTHOR(S)
Lee, J-H; Lee, K-H; Kim, S; Lee, J-S; Kim, S-H; Kwon, S-W; Kim, W-K
PUB. DATE
January 2000
SOURCE
Bone Marrow Transplantation;1/15/2000, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p179
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Delayed erythropoiesis and pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) have been reported after major ABO-incompatible BMT. We attempted to find risk factors for the development of PRCA in 27 patients who underwent major ABO-incompatible BMT. In all patients, the donor marrow was depleted of RBCs before infusion. In 22 patients, isoagglutinins were determined until they disappeared. In eight (29.6%) out of 27 patients, bone marrow examination following BMT showed the findings of PRCA. We analyzed various clinico-pathologic risk factors and isoagglutinin type was the only significant risk factor. Patients with anti-A isoagglutinins against donor RBC developed PRCA more frequently than patients with anti-B (8/17 vs 0/9). Median days to the disappearance of isoagglutinins tended to be longer in patients with PRCA (PRCA vsnon-PRCA, 200 vs 66 days) and in cases with anti-A isoagglutinins (anti-A vsanti-B, 160 vs 51 days). Times to disappearance of isoagglutinins correlated with times to reticulocytes over 1% and initial appearance of donor type RBC (R2 = 0.708 and 0.711). In conclusion, RBC engraftment following major ABO-incompatible BMT was dependent on the disappearance of isoagglutinins against donor RBC, and anti-A isoagglutinin was a risk factor for the development of PRCA after major ABO-incompatible allogeneic BMT. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 179–184.
ACCESSION #
8888966

 

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