TITLE

Improving quality of life for men using intermittent self-catheterisation

AUTHOR(S)
Woodward, Sue
PUB. DATE
June 2013
SOURCE
British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing;Jun/Jul2013, Vol. 9 Issue 3, p114
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Clean intermittent self-catheterisation (CISC) is often a treatment option for men with urinary incontinence, particularly those with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. In appropriate patients it has been shown to promote continence, maintain safe bladder function and improve quality of life. CISC can promote privacy and dignity for men with urinary incontinence due to impaired bladder emptying. Patient choice regarding product selection is important. There are a range of different products available on prescription for patients, and many have been designed specifically with men in mind. Nurses need to keep up to date with new product availability in order to offer choice to men performing CISC. The LoFric Origo is a new catheter that has recently been added to the UK NHS Drug Tariff.
ACCESSION #
88848511

 

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