TITLE

NEL MEZZO DEL CAMMIN

AUTHOR(S)
SOUZA, Marcos
PUB. DATE
January 2011
SOURCE
Revista de Letras;jan-jun2011, Vol. 51 Issue 1, p155
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In this article I discuss some ideas concerning poetry translation, adopting Longfellow's point of view that the problem of the translator is to reproduce what the author says and how he says it, and not to explain what he means. Following a brief survey of Robert Frost's Stopping by woods in a snowing evening, I analyze two Portuguese translations, finishing with my own translation.
ACCESSION #
88425147

 

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