TITLE

Learning, memory, and transcranial direct current stimulation

AUTHOR(S)
Brasil-Neto, Joaquim P.; Hoy, Kate; Luck, David
PUB. DATE
September 2012
SOURCE
Frontiers in Psychiatry;Sep2012, Vol. 3, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
88074257

 

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