TITLE

ETHICAL MOMENT: HOW SHOULD DENTISTS ADDRESS PATIENTS' AFTER-HOURS EMERGENCIES?

AUTHOR(S)
Raimann, Thomas E.
PUB. DATE
June 2013
SOURCE
Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA);Jun2013, Vol. 144 Issue 6, p661
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article provides an answer to a question of appropriately handling patients' after-hours emergencies for dentists.
ACCESSION #
87975330

 

Related Articles

  • Failure to Keep Boarded Psych Patients Safe Is Med/Malpractice Risk.  // ED Legal Letter;Aug2013, Vol. 24 Issue 8, p92 

    The article discusses hospitalization of psychiatric patients. It mentions that keeping psychiatric patients boarded in emergency departments at health care facilities while awaiting availability of beds is a crucial liability risk for emergency physicians (EPs). It further states that risks for...

  • PLoS Medicine: Patients want more risks disclosed before treatment.  // Biomedical Market Newsletter;8/1/2012, Vol. 21, p1 

    The article offers information on a study which revealed that the risks involved in a surgery are not disclosed to patients by the Australian doctors.

  • CNE Questions.  // Healthcare Risk Management;Oct2007, Vol. 29 Issue 10, p120 

    A quiz concerning the articles published in the issue is presented.

  • The influence of advertising on patient consent and expectations. LUCKMAN, MANDY // Journal of Aesthetic Nursing;Dec2014/Jan2015, Vol. 3 Issue 10, p502 

    No abstract available.

  • Exercising the right to be heard. Quaile, Alistair // Journal of Paramedic Practice;Feb2015, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p59 

    No abstract available.

  • Managers: Don't fail to train staff.  // Patient Education Management;Sep2011, Vol. 18 Issue 9, p105 

    The article discusses "incompetence" as a primary issue in patient safety, as per the report "The Silent Treatment: Why Safety Tools and Checklists Aren't Enough to Save Lives;" Jan Davidson of the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) suggests that managers educate their staff well.

  • Issue with safety? R-E-S-P-E-C-T missing.  // Patient Education Management;Sep2011, Vol. 18 Issue 9, p105 

    The article suggests using a code of conduct as required by "The Joint Commission to curb disrespectful behavior among nurses, clinicians and clerical staff, and mentions the report"The Silent Treatment: Why Safety Tools and Checklists Aren't Enough to Save."

  • Patient Safety in Surgery. Barone, James E. // Patient Safety in Surgery;2015, Vol. 9 Issue 1, p1 

    An introduction is presented in which the editor discusses various reports within the issue on topics including surgical complications, anesthesia, and challenges related to patient safety.

  • TENSIONS IN SHARING CLIENT CONFIDENCES WHILE RESPECTING AUTONOMY: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERPROFESSIONAL PRACTICE. Allison, Althea; Ewens, Ann // Nursing Ethics;Sep98, Vol. 5 Issue 5, p441 

    This article aims to explore the ethical issues arising from the sharing of information in the context of interprofessional collaboration. The increased emphasis on interprofessional working has highlighted the need for greater collaboration and sharing of client information. Through the medium...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics