TITLE

THE PRINCIPLE OF 'SYMPATHETIC MAGIC' IN THE CONTEXT OF HUNTING, TRANCE AND SOUTHERN AFRICAN ROCK ART

AUTHOR(S)
Thackeray, J. Francis
PUB. DATE
April 2013
SOURCE
Digging Stick;Apr2013, Vol. 30 Issue 1, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the general idea associated with the rationale of sympathetic hunting magic in southern Africa which the author suggests that some cases are closely linked to trance-associated rituals. These rites involve a hunter who believed he could access control over game, and in which he was associated with a dying animal. The article relates the rock art called "The White Lady of the Brandberg" found in Namibia.
ACCESSION #
87966382

 

Related Articles

  • INTRODUCING THE QING AND ORPEN PROJECT. Wright, John; de Prada-Samper, José // Digging Stick;Apr2013, Vol. 30 Issue 1, p5 

    The article discusses the academic research done on southern African rock art in the 1970s. It references the article "A glimpse into the mythology of the Maluti Bushmen" by Joseph Orpen which was published in the "Cape Monthly Magazine" in July 1874. The article is cited to be the only known...

  • SEX, SPIRITS AND SOCIETY. George, Leanne // Digging Stick;Apr2011, Vol. 28 Issue 1, p1 

    The article discusses the abstract concepts RSA MEL 8 in the Maclear District of the Eastern Cape Province. It notes how the San rock art depicts San beliefs and fragments of the ritual trance dance and the importance of animal fat to the San. It indicates that power can become important in a...

  • RHYTHM AND RITUAL. Douglas, Carlyle C. // Ebony;Aug1976, Vol. 31 Issue 10, p133 

    The article provides information on African arts which become valuable if they are used in a ritual dance. It states that African artists are direct and intense of their works because they are doing them for their tradition. It cites that the works of the African sculptors are not symbolic, but...

  • THE ROAD TO UNDERSTANDING. Lewis-Williams, David // Digging Stick;Apr2012, Vol. 29 Issue 1, p11 

    The author highlights his attempts to understand San rock art. Two sources of information became accessible to rock art researchers in the 1950s that led to debates about what constitute San beliefs and rituals, and to confusion over the word pan. Evidence showed some of the full range of...

  • Constructing spiritual panoramas: order and chaos in southern African San rock art panels. Lewis-Williams, J. D.; Pearce, D. G. // Southern African Humanities;Dec2009, Vol. 21, p41 

    To a Western eye, San rock art panels are chaotic accumulations of disparate images. Yet the panels themselves, seen in the light of San beliefs, are constructed according to certain principles. This article identifies some of those principles and exemplifies them by analysing a panel at a site...

  • Rock art, myth and sacred landscapes: the case of a rock art site in Tororo District, Uganda. Namono, Catherine // Southern African Humanities;Dec2008, Vol. 20, p317 

    A rock art site located in Tororo District, eastern Uganda has become a shrine. The shrine derives from beliefs Bantu-speaking ethnic groups have, but belongs to a Western Nilotic-speaking people. A myth about the emergence of the shrine attempts to rationalize its occupation by the present...

  • Congolese uses of cupules. LOMBRY, GEORGES E. // Rock Art Research;Nov2008, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p207 

    The article presents information on the interpretation and use of cupules from the Democratic Republic of Congo. According to the old chief Awlngara Tukpwo, member of the council of the bakumba and of the ruling class of the Zande, the cupules were used for several purposes during the 19th...

  • Bredarör on Kivik: a monumental cairn and the history of its interpretation. Goldhahn, Joakim // Antiquity;Jun2009, Vol. 83 Issue 320, p359 

    The famous monumental Bronze Age cairn Bredarör on Kivik with its decorated stone coffin or cist has been described as a 'pyramid of the north'. Situating his work as the latest stage in a long history of interpretation that began in the eighteenth century, the author analyses the human bone...

  • Human cognition: the Australian evidence. Mulvaney, John; Carver, Martin // Antiquity;Sep2012, Vol. 86 Issue 333, p915 

    The author argues the importance of Australian evidence, including burial and art, for modern human behaviour in cognitive archaeology. The author focuses on burials including the Pleistocene Lake Mungo burials, suggesting that they have implications for human self-awareness. The author also...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics