TITLE

Optimal Graft Length for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Biomechanical Study in Beagles

AUTHOR(S)
YUAN, FENG; ZHOU, WEI; CAI, JUNFENG; ZHAO, JINZHONG; HUANGFU, XIAOQIAO; YIN, FENG
PUB. DATE
May 2013
SOURCE
Orthopedics;May2013, Vol. 36 Issue 5, pe588
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a major ligament that helps maintain the stability of the knee joint. Injury to the ACL can be treated by replacing the torn ligament. This study determined the optimal flexor tendon length in the bone tunnel in ACL reconstruction. Autologous ACL reconstruction was performed using a flexor tendon in 54 male beagles, with the graft length in the bone tunnel at 5, 9, 13, 17, 21, and 25 mm (9 dogs per graft length). The maximum tensile strength and stiffness of the reconstructed joint (tibia-ACL-femur triad) were recorded at 45, 90, and 180 days after ACL reconstruction (6 joints per time point). The experiment also included an intact control group (3 dogs) and a control group tested immediately after the reconstruction (3 dogs). For the intact control group, the normal ACL (unreconstructed) and flexor tendon mechanical testing was performed. For the other control group, the normal ACL (unreconstructed) mechanical testing was performed first and then mechanical testing of the specimens was performed immediately after reconstruction. The maximum tensile strength and stiffness of the reconstructed tibia-ACL-femur triad increased with time after reconstruction, regardless of the graft length in the bone tunnel. Maximum tensile strength and stiffness of the grafts increased with graft length but reached a plateau at 17 mm. Optimal strength and stiffness of the reconstructed ACL are achieved with 17-mm grafts.
ACCESSION #
87602455

 

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