TITLE

The Piety of a Heretic: Spinoza's Interpretation of Judaism

AUTHOR(S)
Frankel, Steven
PUB. DATE
November 2002
SOURCE
Journal of Jewish Thought & Philosophy (Routledge);Nov2002, Vol. 11 Issue 2, p117
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the interpretation of Judaism in the piety of a heretic. Cultivation of the universal religion of tolerance; Establishment of a biblical hermeneutic and set of religious dogmas; Support for the foundation of liberal democracy.
ACCESSION #
8755749

 

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