TITLE

Feeding by Whiteflies Suppresses Downstream Jasmonic Acid Signaling by Eliciting Salicylic Acid Signaling

AUTHOR(S)
Zhang, Peng-Jun; Li, Wei-Di; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Jin-Ming; Xu, Fang-Cheng; Lu, Yao-Bin
PUB. DATE
May 2013
SOURCE
Journal of Chemical Ecology;May2013, Vol. 39 Issue 5, p612
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Phloem-feeding whiteflies in the species complex Bemisia tabaci cause extensive crop damage worldwide. One of the reasons for their 'success' is their ability to suppress the effectual jasmonic acid (JA) defenses of the host plant. However, little is understood about the mechanisms underlying whitefly suppression of JA-regulated defenses. Here, we showed that the expression of salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes ( EDS1 and PR1) in Arabidopsis thaliana was significantly enhanced during feeding by whitefly nymphs. Whereas upstream JA-responsive genes ( LOX2 and OPR3) also were induced, the downstream JA-responsive gene ( VSP1) was repressed, i.e., whiteflies only suppressed downstream JA signaling. Gene-expression analyses with various Arabidopsis mutants, including NahG, npr-1, ein2-1, and dde2-2, revealed that SA signaling plays a key role in the suppression of downstream JA defenses by whitefly feeding. Assays confirmed that SA activation enhanced whitefly performance by suppressing downstream JA defenses.
ACCESSION #
87445954

 

Related Articles

  • Tomato Pathogenesis-related Protein Genes are Expressed in Response to Trialeurodes vaporariorum and Bemisia tabaci Biotype B Feeding. Puthoff, David P.; Holzer, Frances M.; Perring, Thomas M.; Walling, Linda L. // Journal of Chemical Ecology;Nov2010, Vol. 36 Issue 11, p1271 

    The temporal and spatial expression of tomato wound- and defense-response genes to Bemisia tabaci biotype B (the silverleaf whitefly ) and Trialeurodes vaporariorum (the greenhouse whitefly) feeding were characterized. Both species of whiteflies evoked similar changes in tomato gene expression....

  • Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Defenses Play a Key Role in Defending Tomato Against Bemisia tabaci Nymphs, but Not Adults. Peng-Jun Zhang; Yu-Chen He; Chan Zhao; Zi-Hong Ye; Xiao-Ping Yu // Frontiers in Plant Science;7/20/2018, p1 

    The silverleaf whitefly Bemisia tabaci is an important and invasive crop pest in many countries. Previous laboratory studies with Arabidopsis demonstrated that B. tabaci can suppress jasmonic acid (JA) defenses and thereby enhance B. tabaci performance. Whether B. tabaci can suppress...

  • Rapid Spread of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus in China Is Aided Differentially by Two Invasive Whiteflies. Huipeng Pan; Dong Chu; Wenqian Yan; Qi Su; Baiming Liu; Shaoli Wang; Qingjun Wu; Wen Xie; Xiaoguo Jiao; Rumei Li; Nina Yang; Xin Yang; Baoyun Xu; Brown, Judith K.; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun // PLoS ONE;Apr2012, Vol. 7 Issue 4, p1 

    Background: Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) was introduced into China in 2006, approximately 10 years after the introduction of an invasive whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) B biotype. Even so the distribution and prevalence of TYLCV remained limited, and the economic damage was minimal....

  • Differentiating and controlling whiteflies. Byrne, Frank J. // American Nurseryman;12/1/2006, Vol. 204 Issue 11, p10 

    The article presents information on how to differentiate and control whiteflies. It has indicated that the silverleaf whitefly is the B-biotype of the sweetpotato whitefly. The insect has a strong propensity to develop resistance to insecticides, making it difficult to control. Resistance occurs...

  • Rapid Spread of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus in China Is Aided Differentially by Two Invasive Whiteflies. Huipeng Pan; Dong Chu; Wenqian Yan; Qi Su; Baiming Liu; Shaoli Wang; Qingjun Wu; Wen Xie; Xiaoguo Jiao; Rumei Li; Nina Yang; Xin Yang; Baoyun Xu; Brown, Judith K.; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun // PLoS ONE;Apr2012, Vol. 7 Issue 4, p1 

    Background: Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) was introduced into China in 2006, approximately 10 years after the introduction of an invasive whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) B biotype. Even so the distribution and prevalence of TYLCV remained limited, and the economic damage was minimal....

  • Influx of extracellular Ca2+ involved in jasmonic-acid-induced elevation of [Ca2+]cyt and JR1 expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. Qing-Peng Sun; Yi Guo; Ying Sun; Da-Ye Sun; Xiao-Jing Wang // Journal of Plant Research;Jul2006, Vol. 119 Issue 4, p343 

    The changes in cytosolic Ca2+ levels play important roles in the signal transduction pathways of many environmental and developmental stimuli in plants and animals. We demonstrated that the increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells was induced...

  • Regulation by Cytokinins of Endogenous Levels of Jasmonic and Salicylic Acids in Mechanically Wounded Tobacco Plants. Sano, Hiroshi; Seo, Shigemi; Koizumi, Nozomu; Niki, Tomoya; Iwamura, Hajime; Ohashi, Yuko // Plant & Cell Physiology;Sep1996, Vol. 37 Issue 6, p762 

    Plants respond differentially to wounding and pathogens using distinct signaling pathways, so that wound signals are transmitted to jasmonic acid (JA) which induces basic pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins, whereas pathogenic signals cause, in addition to JA, accumulation of salicylic acid (SA)...

  • Jasmonic acid and glucose synergistically modulate the accumulation of glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Guo, Rongfang; Shen, Wangshu; Qian, Hongmei; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lihong; Wang, Qiaomei // Journal of Experimental Botany;Dec2013, Vol. 64 Issue 18, p5707 

    The interplay of plant hormones and glucose (Glu) in regulating glucosinolate accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated in this study. Glucose-induced glucosinolate biosynthesis was enhanced significantly by the addition of jasmonic acid (JA), whereas the synergistic effect of...

  • E-2-hexenal promotes susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato by activating jasmonic acid pathways in Arabidopsis. Scala, Alessandra; Mirabella, Rossana; Mugo, Cynthia; Matsui, Kenji; Haring, Michel A.; Schuurink, Robert C. // Frontiers in Plant Science;Mar2013, Vol. 4, Special section p1 

    Green Leaf Volatiles (GLVs) are C6-molecules - alcohols, aldehydes and esters - produced by plants upon herbivory or during pathogen infection. Exposure to this blend of volatiles induces defence-related responses in neighboring undamaged plants, thus assigning a role to GLVs in regulating plant...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics