TITLE

Burma: Draft Publishing Law Criticized

AUTHOR(S)
Johnson, Constance
PUB. DATE
March 2013
SOURCE
Global Legal Monitor;Mar2013, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the criticism of the Printers and Publishers Registration Act in Burma. It reveals that the draft printing law restricts freedom of the press by banning any printing of material that could be seen as dissenting from the government. In addition, the law establishes a registration system for all printing and publishing enterprises and states that no business can be registered to publish if they have a plan to harm the ideology and views of the government.
ACCESSION #
86669565

 

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