TITLE

$20 million award to parents for removal of the wrong side of child's brain

AUTHOR(S)
Rubin, Jonathan D.; Janovic, Elizabeth V.; Gulinello, Carol
PUB. DATE
April 2013
SOURCE
Healthcare Risk Management;Apr2013 Supplement, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses a court case wherein the parents of a 15-year-old boy were awarded 20 million dollars in damages because during the brain surgery the wrong side of the boy's brain was operated upon. It mentions that instead of operating on the right side of the brain, the surgeon operated upon the left side and removed tissue from it. The surgeon and the hospital failed to follow the National Patient Safety Goal - Universal Protocol or time-out procedure, a must before any major surgery.
ACCESSION #
86637345

 

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