TITLE

Stardust: The Comet Chaser

PUB. DATE
December 2002
SOURCE
Weekly Reader News - Senior;12/13/2002 Teacher's Guide, Vol. 81 Issue 14, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Introduces an article on the Stardust probe used by National Aeronautics and Space Administration in observing comets. Definition of several words used in the article; Questions to consider in discussing the article; Notes and other information related to the article.
ACCESSION #
8647380

 

Related Articles

  • Touch and go. Schrope, Mark // New Scientist;04/22/2000, Vol. 166 Issue 2235, p15 

    Reports on plans of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to build a space probe to study comets. Plans to use a hummingbird-like landing technique to take quick samples; Phases of the mission; Advantages of the concept; Glenn Carle's leadership of the team...

  • Space probes take comet close-ups. Reddy, Francis // Astronomy;May2007, Vol. 35 Issue 5, following p44 

    The article discusses how space probes can offer astronomers views into a comet's nucleus. The Giotto probe of the European Space Agency examined the nucleus of Halley's comet. The Deep Space 1 Probe of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration examined Comet Borrelly. These...

  • NASA's Stardust Review.  // Weekly Reader News - Senior;3/3/2006, Vol. 84 Issue 20, p4 

    Reports on the completion of the journey in space of Stardust, a space probe launched by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration on February 7, 1999. Collection of space particles by Stardust through a comet; Description of the particles collected by Stardust; Expectations of...

  • Close Encounter with a Comet. Lemonick, Michael D.; Cray, Dan // Time;2/8/1999, Vol. 153 Issue 5, p50 

    Comments on a National Aeronautics & Space Administration mission which will use a space probe called Stardust to collect dust particles from a comet called Comet Wild 2. Cost of the mission; When the launch of Stardust would take place; Importance of the mission; Chance that earthly dust could...

  • Close Encounter with a Comet. Lemonick, Michael D.; Cray, Dan // Time International (South Pacific Edition);2/8/1999, Issue 6, p42 

    Comments on a National Aeronautics & Space Administration mission which will use a space probe called Stardust to collect dust particles from a comet called Comet Wild 2. Cost of the mission; When the launch of Stardust would take place; Importance of the mission; Chance that earthly dust could...

  • Comet Catcher.  // Popular Mechanics;Apr99, Vol. 176 Issue 4, p30 

    Provides information on the Deep Space 4 mission of the United States National Aeronatics & Space Administration (NASA) which includes a visit to comet Tempel 1. Activities during the rendezvous with the comet; Complexity of the touchdown of the vehicle.

  • Space probes take comet close-ups. Reddy, Francis // Astronomy;May2007, Vol. 35 Issue 5, following p44 

    The article discusses how space probes can offer astronomers views into a comet's nucleus. The Giotto probe of the European Space Agency examined the nucleus of Halley's comet. The Deep Space 1 Probe of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration examined Comet Borrelly. These...

  • Mission Update. McDowell, Jonathan // Sky & Telescope;Oct2007, Vol. 114 Issue 4, p17 

    The article offers information about the extended missions for Deep Impact and Stardust, the Discovery-class space probes approved by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. In July 2005, Deep Impact intercepted Comet 9P/Tempel 1, which allowed the probe to reach the comet near...

  • NASA SAYS SPACE FIND ISN'T JUST ROCKET FUEL.  // New Scientist;4/14/2007, Vol. 194 Issue 2599, p6 

    The article discusses controversy over the finds of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Stardust capsule which brought back the first sample of comet dust. NASA scientists found an unusual titanium nitride mineral inside a single particle of dust collected by the probe....

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics