TITLE

Does the Fourth Amendment Allow States to Collect and Analyze DNA Samples From People Arrested and Charged With Serious Crimes?

PUB. DATE
April 2013
SOURCE
Supreme Court Debates;Apr2013, Vol. 16 Issue 4, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a debate on whether the Fourth Amendment allows states to collect and analyze deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) samples from people arrested and charged for serious crimes. Advocates claim that the DNA Collection Act contain sufficient safeguards that ensure reasonableness of the search which is a touchstone of the Fourth Amendment. Opposition claims that DNA collection violates the Fourth Amendment because it was not authorized by a warrant nor based on some level of suspicion.
ACCESSION #
86441804

 

Related Articles

  • The interpretation of traces found on adhesive tapes. WIETEN, REMI; DE ZOETE, JACOB; BLANKERS, BART; KOKSHOORN, BAS // Law, Probability & Risk;Dec2015, Vol. 14 Issue 4, p305 

    In violent crimes, adhesive tapes such as duct tape are often used by perpetrators e.g. to tie up a victim. In the forensic examination of such tapes many different types of traces can be found, such as finger marks and human biological traces. These traces are first interpreted at source level....

  • DNA Testing Is forensic DNA testing reliable? Baird, Michael; Neufeld, Peter J.; Scheck, Barry C. // ABA Journal;Sep90, Vol. 76 Issue 9, p34 

    Presents opposing arguments on the reliability of forensic DNA testing at the bar. Value of DNA identification technology at the bar; Critical differences between the diagnostic and forensic applications of DNA typing.

  • DNA evidence and the forensic process: Genetic search and seizure? Urbas, Gregor // Legaldate;Jul2002, Vol. 14 Issue 3, p5 

    Provides information on the use of DNA evidence and forensic process in criminal investigations in Australia.

  • DNA Identifications Are Put to the Test. Janssen, Deborah // Genomics & Proteomics;Jun2003, Vol. 3 Issue 5, p33 

    Discusses the impact of challenging samples and new technologies on the advancement of forensic science's human DNA identification capabilities in the U.S. Establishment of standards for DNA identification; Techniques of DNA analysis; Success rates of DNA identification. INSET: The Techniques...

  • GENETIC FINGERPRINTING. Lowrie, Pauline; Wells, Susan // New Scientist;11/16/91, Vol. 132 Issue 1795, INSIDE SCIENCE p1 

    Focuses on the various applications of genetic fingerprinting. Use of genetic fingerprinting to identify and reunite with their relatives children who went missing during the period of military rule in Argentina; Details of how genetic fingerprints are made; Assumptions and doubts regarding DNA...

  • A crossroad between Criminalistics and Forensic Toxicology. Castelló, Ana; Navarro, Esperanza; Bañón, Rafael; Verdú, Fernando // Internet Journal of Forensic Science;2009, Vol. 4 Issue 1, p1 

    Biological stains found at crime scene, are basically intended for DNA identification. Toxicology, however, can usually supply additional information. For example, the possible use of toxic materials to force the victim of some crime to yield. Some of the difficulties of analysing stains from a...

  • A PERSPECTIVE ON THE APPROPRIATE WEIGHT TO BE GIVEN TO THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES' REPORT ON FORENSICS IN EVIDENTIARY HEARINGS: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF CONTINUED COURT ACCEPTANCE OF FINGERPRINT EVIDENCE. Plumtree, Wayne G. // Southwestern Law Review;2013, Vol. 42 Issue 3, p605 

    At the behest of Congress, the National Academy of Sciences assessed the quality of forensic science and issued a report in early 2009. This report, Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward, offered many recommendations, but embraced the premise that forensic DNA...

  • Palatal Rugae: Systematic Analysis of its Shape and Dimensions for Use in Human Identification. Hermosilla Venegas, Valeria; San Pedro Valenzuela, Jaime; Cantín López, Mario; Claudio Suazo Galdames, Iván // International Journal of Morphology;2009, Vol. 27 Issue 3, p819 

    Establish a person's identity can be a very complex process, one of the main objectives of the forensic sciences. The analysis of the teeth, fingerprints and DNA comparison, are probably the most used technics, allowing fast and secure identification processes. However, these techniques can not...

  • Single hair reveals crime-scene DNA.  // New Scientist;9/14/2013, Vol. 219 Issue 2934, p16 

    The article discusses a study by Adrian Linacre of Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia and colleagues in a 2013 issue of the journal "Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology" reporting the development of a method for DNA profiling, using sweat or hair, that bypasses the extraction step.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics