TITLE

LOWER COURT HOLDING IN KING V. MARYLAND

PUB. DATE
April 2013
SOURCE
Supreme Court Debates;Apr2013, Vol. 16 Issue 4, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the case King v. Maryland and evaluates the rights given to and withdrawn from citizens who have been arrested based on DNA evidence. According to the article, under the totality of circumstances balancing test, King has sufficient reasonable expectation of privacy against such warrantless arrest. It showed that the State did not outweigh its purported interest in assuring proper identification of King as to the crimes for which he was charged at that time.
ACCESSION #
86441803

 

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