TITLE

EXTENSION AND OBFUSCATION: TWO CONTRASTING ATTITUDES TO THE MORAL BOUNDARY

AUTHOR(S)
KUMASAKA, MOTOHIRO
PUB. DATE
December 2012
SOURCE
Hitotsubashi Journal of Social Studies;Dec2012, Vol. 44 Issue 2, p21
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the Japanese culture that improves the relationship between human beings and nature. It analyzes the concept of anthropocentrism and discusses the effort of Western environmentalism to overcome anthropocentrism. It states that extensionism desires to protect nature and includes moral community. It also mentions the advantages and limitation of Japanese culture in anthropocentrism.
ACCESSION #
86440531

 

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