TITLE

Exotic pet markets could risk public health

PUB. DATE
November 2012
SOURCE
Veterinary Ireland Journal;Nov2012, Vol. 2 Issue 11, p536
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information on the risk of public health due to Reptile and amphibian pet markets.
ACCESSION #
86433583

 

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