TITLE

Externalizing Problems in Late Childhood as a Function of Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Environmental Risk

AUTHOR(S)
Bennett, David S.; Marini, Victoria A.; Berzenski, Sara R.; Carmody, Dennis P.; Lewis, Michael
PUB. DATE
April 2013
SOURCE
Journal of Pediatric Psychology;Apr2013, Vol. 38 Issue 3, p296
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objective To examine whether prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) predicts externalizing problems in late childhood. Methods Externalizing problems were assessed using caregiver, teacher, and child ratings and a laboratory task when children (N = 179; 74 cocaine exposed) were aged 8–10 years. PCE, environmental risk, sex, neonatal health, other prenatal exposures, and foster care history were examined as predictors of externalizing problems. Results Multiple regression analyses indicated that PCE, environmental risk, and male sex explained significant variance in externalizing problems in late childhood. Models varied by source of information. PCE predicted externalizing problems for child laboratory behavior and interacted with sex because males with PCE reported more externalizing problems. PCE did not predict caregiver or teacher ratings of externalizing problems. Conclusions The effect of PCE on externalizing problems may persist into late childhood. The findings highlight the potential importance of including child-based measures of externalizing problems in studies of prenatal exposure.
ACCESSION #
86428163

 

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