TITLE

FFA would back NFU legal case

AUTHOR(S)
Davies, Isabel; Riley, Jonathan
PUB. DATE
October 2002
SOURCE
Farmers Weekly;10/18/2002, Vol. 137 Issue 16, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the support to be provided by the British Farmers For Action (FFA) organization to the National Farmers' Union (NFU) if it decides to file a legal case against the Rural Payments Agency (RPA) or the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs for their late support payments to livestock producers. Recommendation of FFA chairman David Handley to NFU; Views on the legal action planned against the RPA.
ACCESSION #
8605149

 

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