TITLE

Disability in patients consulting for anxiety or mood disorders in primary care: response to antidepressant treatment

AUTHOR(S)
Gérard, Alain; Liard, François; Crochard, Anne; Goni, Sylvia; Millet, Bruno
PUB. DATE
December 2012
SOURCE
Neuropsychiatric Disease & Treatment;2012 Part 2, Vol. 8, p605
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: The primary objective of this prospective observational study was to evaluate changes in self-reported disability in patients with anxiety or mood disorders 3 months after initiating antidepressant treatment. Methods: This study included 8396 patients consulting 2433 general practitioners in France for a major mood episode, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or obsessive-compulsive disorder. Treatment was initiated with the antidepressant that the physician considered appropriate. Patients were evaluated with the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks. Results: At 12 weeks, 6617 patients (78.8%) were evaluable. At inclusion, the mean SDS subscores were 6.5 ± 2.2 on the work/school activities dimension, 6.8 ± 1.9 on the social activities dimension, and 6.5 ± 2.0 on the family life dimension. At the 12-week follow-up visit, the mean change in score on these three dimensions was -3.9 ± 2.6, -4.2 ± 2.5, and -4.0 ± 2.5, respectively. At the 12-week follow-up visit, 90.0% of patients were responders (defined as patients whose SDS dimension scores decreased by at least one point) on the work/school SDS subscores; 92.8% were responders on the social life SDS subscores, and 91.1% were responders on family life/home responsibilities SDS subscores. Functional remission (defined as an SDS subscore of 0 at study end) rates were 18.0% for the work/school dimension, 16.8% for the social activities dimension, and 19.5% for the family life dimension. Using a cutoff of ≤2, remission rates were 56.8%, 55.0%, and 58.0%, respectively. Improvements in self-rated disability were correlated with improvements in symptoms measured with clinician-rated CGI-S. Conclusion: Patients consulting for anxiety or mood disorders report significant disability, which can be effectively reduced by antidepressant treatment.
ACCESSION #
84699360

 

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