TITLE

THE IMPACT OF WATCHING SUBTITLED ANIMATED CARTOONS ON INCIDENTAL VOCABULARY LEARNING OF ELT STUDENTS

AUTHOR(S)
Karakas, Ali; Sari�oban, Arif
PUB. DATE
October 2012
SOURCE
Teaching English with Technology;Oct2012, Vol. 12 Issue 4, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This study aimed to find out whether watching subtitled cartoons influences incidental vocabulary learning. The study was conducted with 42 first grade English Language Teaching (ELT) department students at the University of Mehmet Akif Ersoy, Burdur. To collect data from the subjects, a 5-point vocabulary knowledge scale was used and 18 target words were integrated into the scale. The pre-test and post-test group design was selected for the administration. After subjects had been randomly assigned into two groups (one subtitle group and the other no-subtitle group), they were given the same pre- and post-tests. The findings of study did not support the assumption that the subtitle group would outperform the no-subtitle group, since there were no significant differences between two groups according to t-test results. However, there was significant improvement in both of the groups from pre-test to post-test scores. This progress was attributed to the presentation of target words in cartoons. In this way, the target words were contextualized and it became easy for participants to elicit the meanings of the words.
ACCESSION #
84466715

 

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