TITLE

The Impact of Context Collapse and Privacy on Social Network Site Disclosures

AUTHOR(S)
Vitak, Jessica
PUB. DATE
October 2012
SOURCE
Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media;Oct2012, Vol. 56 Issue 4, p451
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A large body of research argues that self-presentation strategies vary based on audience. But what happens when the technical features of Web sites enable—or even require—users to make personal disclosures to multiple audiences at once, as is often the case on social network sites (SNSs)? Do users apply a lowest common denominator approach, only making disclosures that are appropriate for all audience members? Do they employ technological tools to disaggregate audiences? When considering the resources that can be harnessed from SNS interactions, researchers suggest users need to engage with their network in order to reap benefits. The present study presents a model including network composition, disclosures, privacy-based strategies, and social capital. Results indicate that (1) audience size and diversity impacts disclosures and use of advanced privacy settings, (2) privacy concerns and privacy settings impact disclosures in varying ways; and (3) audience and disclosure characteristics predict bridging social capital.
ACCESSION #
84221415

 

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