TITLE

PROTECTING THE SILENT THIRD PARTY: THE NEED FOR LEGISLATIVE REFORM WITH RESPECT TO INFORMED CONSENT AND RESEARCH ON HUMAN BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS

AUTHOR(S)
Dunn, Catherine K.
PUB. DATE
July 2012
SOURCE
Charleston Law Review;Summer2012, Vol. 6 Issue 4, p635
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on biotechnology legislation, and the informed consent of human biological materials and the problems arises in the informed consent. It related the case of African American woman Henrietta Lacks, whose a small piece of her normal cervical tissue was removed by a physical without her consent. It discusses the goal, history, and legal framework of the doctrine of informed consent.
ACCESSION #
83538137

 

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