TITLE

Fungal skin infections in children

AUTHOR(S)
Robinson, Jean
PUB. DATE
November 2012
SOURCE
Nursing Standard;11/14/2012, Vol. 27 Issue 11, p52
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Fungal skin infections have increased in prevalence over the past 30 years. The pathogenic fungi that cause these infections can be classified into dermatophytes and yeasts. Dermatophytes cause infections of keratinised tissue, such as hair, skin and nails. Yeasts can cause superficial infections or more deep-seated infections in people who are immunocompromised. Fungal skin infections are a common problem in children and can be uncomfortable and upsetting. However, the availability of effective treatment options has also increased.
ACCESSION #
83517660

 

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