TITLE

Winter Vegetable Gardening: Getting The Most Fruit For Your Labor

AUTHOR(S)
Newby, Josh
PUB. DATE
October 2012
SOURCE
Pensacola Magazine;Oct/Nov2012, p28
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses vegetable gardening tips during winters in Pensacola, Florida. It informs that rising food costs and food safety concerns have caused an increase in homegrown vegetables. It informs that laying cardboards on top of plots before planting makes the grass and weeds smooth and will enrich the soil beneath. It also informs that watering must be done in the morning so that the moisture is maintained.
ACCESSION #
83237792

 

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