TITLE

MONEY MANAGERS IN THE MIDDLE: SEEING AND SANCTIONING POLITICAL SPENDING AFTER CITIZENS UNITED

AUTHOR(S)
Taub, Jennifer S.
PUB. DATE
April 2012
SOURCE
New York University Journal of Legislation & Public Policy;Spring2012, Vol. 15 Issue 2, p443
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on the expansion in the First Amendment rights of corporations for engaging in political spending. The procedures of corporate democracy, federal securities laws and regulations and the role of the U.S. Congress and Securities and Exchange Commission related to disclosure shortages are discussed. The issues related to corporate governance and the suggestions for regulating corporate political spending is also discussed.
ACCESSION #
82191918

 

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