TITLE

Evaluating Locally Available Materials as Partial Replacement for Cement

AUTHOR(S)
Apata, A. O.; Alhassan, A. Y.
PUB. DATE
August 2012
SOURCE
Journal of Emerging Trends in Engineering & Applied Sciences;Aug2012, Vol. 3 Issue 4, p725
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The study investigated the effect of locally available materials as binders on the quality of concrete made with it in order to conserve funds used in the importation of gypsum and to proffer solution to the environmental degradation posed by dumping of rice husk in the country. Several mixes of binders were made with these materials: rice husk ash, calcined clay and lime as Sample B, fly ash, calcined clay and lime as Sample C, rice husk ash, calcined clay, fly ash and lime as Sample D and Sample E consist of rice husk ash, calcined clay, fly ash and 10% ordinary Portland cement (OPC). The samples were subjected to some physical and mechanical tests. The results of these tests were compared with those of Sample A containing only OPC. It was observed that samples B and E were found to exhibit fineness closely related to sample A. It was also observed that concrete made with these local materials exhibited lower strength than concrete made with OPC. However, their strength values were higher than those obtained from sawdust concrete and palm fruit fiber concretes. It was concluded that partial replacement of these local materials termed pozzolana with 10% OPC, can be adopted for low cost housing.
ACCESSION #
80534640

 

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