TITLE

Carbachol-Induced Volume Adaptation in Mouse Bladder and Length Adaptation via Rhythmic Contraction in Rabbit Detrusor

AUTHOR(S)
Speich, John; Wilson, Cameron; Almasri, Atheer; Southern, Jordan; Klausner, Adam; Ratz, Paul
PUB. DATE
October 2012
SOURCE
Annals of Biomedical Engineering;Oct2012, Vol. 40 Issue 10, p2266
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The length-tension ( L- T) relationships in rabbit detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) are similar to those in vascular and airway smooth muscles and exhibit short-term length adaptation characterized by L- T curves that shift along the length axis as a function of activation and strain history. In contrast to skeletal muscle, the length-active tension ( L- T) curve for rabbit DSM strips does not have a unique peak tension value with a single ascending and descending limb. Instead, DSM can exhibit multiple ascending and descending limbs, and repeated KCl-induced contractions at a particular muscle length on an ascending or descending limb display increasingly greater tension. In the present study, mouse bladder strips with and without urothelium exhibited KCl-induced and carbachol-induced length adaptation, and the pressure-volume relationship in mouse whole bladder displayed short-term volume adaptation. Finally, prostaglandin-E-induced low-level rhythmic contraction produced length adaptation in rabbit DSM strips. A likely role of length adaptation during bladder filling is to prepare DSM cells to contract efficiently over a broad range of volumes. Mammalian bladders exhibit spontaneous rhythmic contraction (SRC) during the filling phase and SRC is elevated in humans with overactive bladder (OAB). The present data identify a potential physiological role for SRC in bladder adaptation and motivate the investigation of a potential link between short-term volume adaptation and OAB with impaired contractility.
ACCESSION #
79824166

 

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