TITLE

Effects of The Coach Approach intervention on psychosocial predictors of exercise and subsequent changes in glucose metabolism, cardiorespiratory functioning, and body composition: a pilot project of the interior health of British Columbia and a

AUTHOR(S)
Annesi, James J.; Tennant, Gisele; Chapman, Angela; Sewell, Karlene
PUB. DATE
March 2012
SOURCE
Archives of Exercise in Health & Disease;Mar2012, Vol. 3 Issue 1/2, p162
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objective: Exercise typically improves overall health and reduces health risks; however, completion of even the minimum recommended volume of daily exercise is rare for most people. When recommended by medical professionals, patients may benefit from convenient, evidence-based, exercise-support processes. The aim of this study was to assess the preliminary effects of such an intervention when administered jointly by the Interior Health Authority of British Columbia and a local YMCA. Design: Participants were overweight or obese adult patients (N=92; mean age =59 years) who suffered from cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or renal disease and were referred by medical professionals. The Coach Approach - a standardized 6-month, cognitive-behavioral based protocol that is designed to provide support for maintained exercise - was individually administered through six 30-minute sessions at a variety of community health locations. Results: Significant within-group improvements in the psychosocial measures of self-regulatory skill usage, exercise self-efficacy, mood, and physical self-concept were observed. Also, improvements in exercise volume and measures of glucose metabolism, cardiovascular functioning, and body composition were found. Multiple regression analysis indicated that changes in self-regulation, self-efficacy, and mood accounted for a significant portion of the variance (R2=0.24) in the change in volume of exercise. Significant linear bivariate relationships were observed between an increase in exercise volume and improvements in hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, and body mass index. Conclusion: These findings suggest that increases in exercise volume are associated with proposed psychosocial pathways. Based on the associated reductions in health risks, collaborations between public health agencies and community organizations could be used to address the need for evidence-based support of patients' exercise behaviors.
ACCESSION #
79757490

 

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