New health benefits boost sales: Yogurt

June 1998
FoodService Director;06/15/98, Vol. 11 Issue 6, p104
Trade Publication
Looks at the popularity of yogurt. Yogurt manufacturers' provision of flavorful, low-fat and no-fat yogurt products; Incorporation of yogurt into recipes; Popularity of yogurt in school cafeterias and hospitals.


Related Articles

  • Will the real yogurt please identify itself?  // Current Health 2;Apr91, Vol. 17 Issue 8, p11 

    Reports that newer varieties of yogurt may be more pudding than yogurt. Suggests that the original yogurt (without frills) contain more nutrients and will be more beneficial.

  • Yogurt may not be fountain of youth, but it can provide many other benefits. DiGiampaolo, E. // Diabetes in the News;Jan/Feb92, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p44 

    Describes the many benefits to be had by adding yogurt to one's daily diet. Yogurt that contains the bacteria lactobacillus acidophilus can aid digestion; Fat content; Helps to fight foodborne infections; Aiding weight loss; Varieties; Yogurt-milk exchanges for diabetics; Yogurt recipes. ...

  • Sparkling yogurt refreshes. Gorski, Donna // Dairy Foods;Aug96, Vol. 97 Issue 8, p40 

    Reports on the sparkling yogurt developed by researchers at Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah. Description of the flavor from carbonation; Packaging considerations.

  • Yogurt: Curds and whey of health.  // Executive Health's Good Health Report;Jan1996, Vol. 32 Issue 4, p6 

    Reports that yogurt is an exceptionally nutritious source of calcium and a substitute for foods higher in fat. What yogurt is said to be a cure for; Differences in yogurts; Yogurt lingo.

  • Milking the health-food market.  // FDA Consumer;Nov86, Vol. 20 Issue 9, p12 

    Yogurt, a fermented milk product, comes in many varieties: fruit-filled, frozen, low-fat and non-fat, and so on. Now new variations are coming: Yogurt with veggies, soy-bean yogurt, and a cultured milk drink called kefir. They differ in taste, as well as nutritionally, but share in the knack...

  • Getting a little culture. Hurley, Jayne; Schmidt, Stephen // Nutrition Action Health Letter;Jun93, Vol. 20 Issue 5, p12 

    Examines the nutrients and additives found in commercially-produced yogurt. Yogurts with not more than 15 percent of calories from fat; Sugar content; Calcium content; Production of yogurt; Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus; Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacteria. ...

  • Yogurt. Liebman, Bonnie; Hurley, Jayne; Meltzer, Wendy // Nutrition Action Health Letter;Apr98, Vol. 25 Issue 3, p14 

    Provides information on yogurt. Nutritional value; Yogurt's provision of help for people with trouble in digesting lactose; Yogurt products with too little calcium.

  • Monkey bubs.  // Ranger Rick;Jul96, Vol. 30 Issue 7, p35 

    Presents a yogurt mix recipe made from bananas, vanilla yogurt, milk and orange juice.

  • YOGURT: NOT JUST A SNACK. Rydell, W. // Saturday Evening Post;Jan/Feb91, Vol. 263 Issue 1, p70 

    Presents recipes for yogurt used in soups, entrees, and salads. Alternatives to mayonnaise and sour cream; Nutritional data on yogurt; Positive benefits of yogurt bacteria.

  • Cold product, hot company. Barrier, M. // Nation's Business;Sep88, Vol. 76 Issue 9, p77 

    Describes TCBY enterprises which was founded as a hobby by 51-year-old Frank D. Hickingbotham as a single frozen-yogurt shop in Little Rock, Ark., in 1981. It is now a 1000 shop franchise.


Read the Article


Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics