TITLE

Lessons for Chaplaincy from a Management Secondment

AUTHOR(S)
Macritchie, Iain
PUB. DATE
May 2012
SOURCE
Scottish Journal of Healthcare Chaplaincy;May2012, Vol. 15 Issue 1, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Following a secondment in NHS management, the author reflects on the absence of spiritual care from many of the policies that shape the delivery of healthcare in NHS Scotland. He calls for a greater integration of existing spiritual care and chaplaincy policy with NHS Scotland's policies. He looks at ways in which chaplaincy can contribute to the process of greater integration by becoming more involved in current changes in healthcare delivery. He applies some of the lessons learned in the management secondment to his current practice as a Mental Health and Learning Disability Chaplain.
ACCESSION #
78228904

 

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