TITLE

Renal transplantation in patients with familial Mediterranean fever

AUTHOR(S)
Erdem, Emre; Karatas, Ahmet; Kaya, Coskun; Dilek, Melda; Yakupoglu, Yarkın; Arık, Nurol; Akpolat, Tekin
PUB. DATE
August 2012
SOURCE
Clinical Rheumatology;Aug2012, Vol. 31 Issue 8, p1183
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Amyloidosis is the most common and devastating complication of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Renal transplantation is the choice of treatment of in most end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We report our experience on the outcomes in eight patients who underwent renal transplantation for ESRD due to FMF secondary to amyloidosis, and we provide a discussion on the current evidence on this topic of study. The clinical charts of eight renal transplant patients (seven male, one female) who underwent ESRD due to FMF-related amyloidosis were investigated. Five patients underwent living-donor renal transplantation and three patients underwent deceased-donor renal transplant. The mean follow-up period was 35 months (range 3-72). All patients were on triple immunosuppressive treatment and received colchicine. All allografts are currently functioning well with a mean serum creatinine level of 1.4 (range 0.7-2.6) mg/dL. Posttransplantation complications included acute rejection ( n = 4), chronic rejection ( n = 1), severe gastroenteritis ( n = 2), and erythrocytosis ( n = 5). None of the patients had proteinuria. During follow-up, we did not observe clinically severe FMF attack, septicemia, rhabdomylosis, symptoms related to vasculitis, and clinical neuropathy. The clinical outcome of the patients in this cohort was similar to that of other renal transplant patients with ESRD due to other causes. This study shows favorable prognosis of eight ESRD patients due to amyloidosis caused by FMF after renal transplantation. Renal transplantation is a safe procedure for ESRD patients having amyloidosis due to FMF. Regular use of colchicine after transplantation should be mentioned.
ACCESSION #
78163829

 

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