TITLE

Hybrid wing body aircraft system noise assessment with propulsion airframe aeroacoustic experiments

AUTHOR(S)
Thomas, Russell H.; Burley, Casey L.; Olson, Erik D.
PUB. DATE
September 2012
SOURCE
International Journal of Aeroacoustics;Sep2012, Vol. 11 Issue 3/4, p369
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A system noise assessment of a hybrid wing body configuration was performed using NASA's best available aircraft models, engine model, and system noise assessment method. A propulsion airframe aeroacoustic effects experimental database for key noise sources and interaction effects was used to provide data directly in the noise assessment where prediction methods are inadequate. NASA engine and aircraft system models were created to define the hybrid wing body aircraft concept as a twin engine aircraft with a 7500 nautical mile mission. The engines were modeled as existing technology, in production, bypass ratio seven turbofans. The baseline hybrid wing body aircraft was assessed at 26.4 dB cumulative below the FAA Stage 4 certification level. To determine the potential for noise reduction with relatively near term technologies, seven other configurations were assessed beginning with moving the engines two fan nozzle diameters upstream of the trailing edge and then adding technologies for reduction of the highest noise sources. Aft radiated noise was expected to be the most challenging to reduce and, therefore, the experimental database focused on jet nozzle and pylon configurations that could reduce jet noise through a combination of source reduction and shielding effectiveness. The best configuration for reduction of jet noise used state-of-the-art technology chevrons with a pylon above the engine in the crown position. This configuration resulted in jet source noise reduction, favorable azimuthal directivity, and noise source relocation upstream where it is more effectively shielded by the limited airframe surface, and additional fan noise attenuation from acoustic liner on the crown pylon internal surfaces. Vertical and elevon surfaces were also assessed to add shielding effectiveness. The elevon deflection above the trailing edge showed some small additional noise reduction whereas vertical surfaces resulted in a slight noise increase. With the effects of the configurations from the database included, the best available noise reduction was 41.5 dB cumulative. Projected effects from additional technologies were assessed for an advanced noise reduction configuration including landing gear fairings and advanced pylon and chevron nozzles. Incorporating the three additional technology improvements, an aircraft noise is projected of 42.9 dB cumulative below the Stage 4 level.
ACCESSION #
78110777

 

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